A Reason to Vote by Marcelle Downing Blaisdell

A Reason to Vote by Marcelle Downing Blaisdell

One thing my parents have taught me to look forward to is voting. Having a say in the community is something that I have been expected to do, and I hope to exceed this expectation when I get older. Middle school is the first time that I have met people who are not expected to vote, or who have parents who don't discuss politics with them. From the time my dad first started discussing politics with me, to my first day of middle school non-voters seemed like a fairy tale. Until I met a person who had no views on the political candidates and didn’t really care if the government fell into ruins. I was horrified. I sat in my chair for a while, listening to this person go on for what felt like decades about how terrible the president is. Yet I noticed the girl I was listening to didn't seem interested in voting at all.

 As middle school progresses, I hear more people like this. What these people don’t seem to realize is that without a president this country would most likely be waging a war against itself, slowly falling apart. When the teens that I have heard from get older, they could lose touch with what is around them. That includes the community and political wars waging around them, such as elections and propositions. If something doesn’t change when these teens are in high-school, they will mostly likely become part of the percentage that chooses not to vote.

 I believe that if more teens voted, it would have a huge impact not only America's future, but their future. Because if they are involved in electing presidents and voting for propositions, not only are they contributing to the country but are also creating a future for themselves. Let’s say that a really big proposition is coming up, one that would improve neighborhood parks, sidewalks, and install speed bumps. The teen, around eighteen to twenty-four, might want to move into one of these neighborhoods when they are older and have a family. So, if they vote “yes” on this proposition, it improves neighborhoods and creates a better future for them.

 This idea sounds easier than it most likely is. I know that kids in my school tend to zone out on speeches, so I would propose that schools make voting issues like this more interactive. Schools around the America could make a game out of this idea, doing something like The Game of Life but instead you have to vote, contribute to the community, and you choose two people in the game to run for president. Schools could also do mini plays and fake elections to get students really involved, having students try out for the play and have multiple fake elections for different positions. I think that if these ideas were introduced to kids my age, teen voting would increase in large amounts.